Posts Tagged "sexual abuse" »

Teen Ashley Billasano Tweets of Abuse 144 Times, Kills Herself

Ashley Billasano Final Twitter Tweets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ashley Billasano, a distraught 18 year old high school student with at least 500 TWITTER followers took her life AFTER she sent a series of shocking messages. No one stopped her. No one called the authorities.

“I went to the bathroom and locked the door,” 18-year-old Ashley Billasano tweeted.

“I took apart a razor. I did what I had to do to forget. I swear after that night I was never the same.”

Billasano told her painful story through the popular social networking site, Twitter. Soon after, she had committed suicide.

In her 144 tweets over 6 hours, Billasano allegedly claimed that she had been molested by a family member and forced into prostitution. She also detailed her unsuccessful attempt at seeking justice.

“It is my understanding she made an outcry apparently a year ago in Williamson County up close to Austin about some allegations of sexual abuse,” Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Department Chief Craig Brady told FOX News. “My understanding, that was looked into the sheriff’s office there, the D.A’S office and a grand jury. There was no indictment issued.”

Close friend Ashly Escamilla told the Houston Chronicle that Billasano’s death was the high schooler’s last attempt to be heard.

“This wasn’t random. She planned this for a reason. She made a decision that this was what she was going to do to get attention if she was not going to get justice.”

Billasano’s mother, Tiffany Ruiz Leskinen, told the paper that being denied help from authorities was too much for her daughter to cope with.

“The detective told her that she had trouble believing her,” her mother told the Houston Chronicle. “Here is someone who has been abused and is forced to be silent for so long. Then the one person you go to looking for help says they might not believe you. The CPS caseworker was a rookie right out of college. She did not know anything and kept saying she had to check with her supervisor.”

According to the report, a spokesman for Texas Child Protective Services said privacy policies keep the agency from confirming if an investigation followed Billasano’s claims.Ashley Billasano

According to the Austin-Statesman, Billasano’s Twitter account was taken down.

An important question, as ABC news noted, is why none of Billasano’s 500 followers called the police, or reached out to help her.

Some people on Facebook and Twitter are wondering why the media are focusing on the 500 Twitter followers who did not do anything. They feel that Texas Children’s Protective Services did not do their job.

The group administrator of a Facebook group, Stop Mental Child Abuse, posted this: “IT’S NOT ABOUT THE TWEETS, IT’s WHY DIDN’T TEXAS CPS DO SOMETHING? 18 years of reported abused and they did nothing! Media only reports on why didn’t twitter friends do something, but the real story is why didn’t CPS do something in 18 years?”

 

On her last day Ashley Billasano tweeted ‘Weeks passed, then I got the call. They said sorry but there isn’t enough evidence I hung up.’

‘That’s when I changed. I didn’t care anymore and the people I was meeting gave me no reason to.’

Police said they didn’t want a lot of detail about her death to be published  to avoid encouraging copy cats, but said it might not be the first time the teen had tried to take her own life.

Authorities believe this was not the first time she had attempted suicide.  She had learned the method on the Internet.

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Posted by admin - November 13, 2011 at 11:52 pm

Categories: Sexual Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Child Molesters – a Behavioral Analysis

Child Molesters: A Behavioral Analysis
“Adults with an added authority (e.g., teachers, camp counselors, coaches, religious leaders, law-enforcement officers, doctors, judges [DA and child protection attorneys]) present even greater problems in the investigation of these cases. Such offenders are in a better position to seduce and manipulate victims and escape responsibility.

The most difficult case of all involves a subject who has an ideal occupation for any child molester: a therapist who specializes in treating troubled children. This offender need only sit in his office while society preselects the most vulnerable victims and brings them to him. The victims are by definition “troubled” and unlikely to be believed if they do make an allegation.

 

“Eighty-one percent of all abuse last year was neglect, a percentage that has changed little in recent years. Neglect refers to a denial of critical care, defined as the failure of a caretaker to provide adequate food, shelter, clothing or other care necessary for the child’s health and welfare when the caretaker is financially able to do so or is offered financial or other reasonable means to do so”.* –LEE ROOD 4-2-2011 (*A.K.A “Reasonable Efforts”, which IS NOT HAPPENING)

“As many as 75 percent of all children in foster care, upon leaving the system, will have experienced sexual abuse. One study by Johns Hopkins University found that the rate of sexual abuse within the foster-care system is more than four times as high as in the general population; in group homes, the rate of sexual abuse is more than 28 times that of the general population.” –Sexual Abuse: An Epidemic in Foster Care Settings? -By Orlow, Orlow & Orlow July 17, 2009

“There are more than half a million children and youth in the U.S. foster care system today. Studies reveal that children are 11 times more likely to be abused in state care than they are in their own homes, and 7 times more likely to die as a result of abuse in the foster care system.” -John Walsh Show April 16, 2003

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Posted by admin - September 25, 2011 at 1:31 am

Categories: Sexual Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sexual Abuse and How It Makes You Feel Inside

sexual_abuse_silence

SEXUAL ABUSE AND HOW IT MAKES YOU FEEL INSIDE

Sexual abuse affects every part of your body,

It affects your heart, mind, body, spirit and also your soul.
It affects your relationships and your relationship with God.
It stops you from trusting, and asking for help.
It stops you from believing in yourself or anything for that matter.
It makes you feel a failure.
It stops you from being able to function properly.
It stops you from speaking, hearing, seeing.
It deceives you, blinds you too the truth.
It blames you also it entraps you, and binds you.
It makes you feel guilty.
It makes you feel dirty.
It takes away your security it also takes away love in your life.
It causes you constant strife throughout your life.
It causes you to be directed wrongly.
It causes you to fear the worst.
It causes you to want to kill yourself.
It causes you to be bitter.
It causes you to have stinking thinking.
It causes you to want revenge.
It causes you anger.
It causes you rage.
It causes you hurt
It causes you pain.
It cause you shame.
It causes you rejection.
It causes you to be abandoned.
It causes you to feel insane.
How can I get off this ongoing train you may say, my advice to you is look to the cross, Jesus died for all of this, he wants to exchange all this for his spirit. Love joy peace patience kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self control wow you may say this is true I am living it, that’s why I share it with those hurting!!!! Jesus is no respecter or of persons what He has and is doing for me He can also do for you!!!!

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Posted by admin - September 24, 2011 at 11:55 pm

Categories: Sexual Abuse Laws   Tags: , , ,

CPS violates these in every case (child protective services violations)

CPS violates these EVERY CASE


Print one of these up and keep it handy it for future use- Violation_Warning-Denial_Rights_under_Color_Law.pdf

 


THE RIGHTS-
The First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution

 


The Statutes-
42 U.S.C. § 671(a)(15) Reasonable Efforts

 

42 U.S.C. § 671(a)(19) Relative Placement


Title 18, U.S.C., Section 241
Conspiracy Against Rights

 

Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : Title 18 : Section 241

This statute makes it unlawful for two or more persons to conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate any person of any state, territory or district in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him/her by the Constitution or the laws of the United States, (or because of his/her having exercised the same).

It further makes it unlawful for two or more persons to go in disguise on the highway or on the premises of another with the intent to prevent or hinder his/her free exercise or enjoyment of any rights so secured.

Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to ten years, or both; and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years, or for life, or may be sentenced to death.


Title 18, U.S.C., Section 242
Deprivation of Rights Under Color of Law

 

Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : Title 18 : Section 242

This statute makes it a crime for any person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom to willfully deprive or cause to be deprived from any person those rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution and laws of the U.S.

This law further prohibits a person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation or custom to willfully subject or cause to be subjected any person to different punishments, pains, or penalties, than those prescribed for punishment of citizens on account of such person being an alien or by reason of his/her color or race.

Acts under “color of any law” include acts not only done by federal, state, or local officials within the bounds or limits of their lawful authority, but also acts done without and beyond the bounds of their lawful authority; provided that, in order for unlawful acts of any official to be done under “color of any law,” the unlawful acts must be done while such official is purporting or pretending to act in the performance of his/her official duties. This definition includes, in addition to law enforcement officials, individuals such as Mayors, Council persons, Judges, Nursing Home Proprietors, Security Guards, etc., persons who are bound by laws, statutes ordinances, or customs.

Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to one year, or both, and if bodily injury results or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire shall be fined or imprisoned up to ten years or both, and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.


Title 18, U.S.C., Section 245
Federally Protected Activities

Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : Title 18 : Section 245

 

1) This statute prohibits willful injury, intimidation, or interference, or attempt to do so, by force or threat of force of any person or class of persons because of their activity as:

a) A voter, or person qualifying to vote…;

b) a participant in any benefit, service, privilege, program, facility, or activity provided or administered by the United States;

c) an applicant for federal employment or an employee by the federal government;

d) a juror or prospective juror in federal court; and

e) a participant in any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.

2) Prohibits willful injury, intimidation, or interference or attempt to do so, by force or threat of force of any person because of race, color, religion, or national origin and because of his/her activity as:

a) A student or applicant for admission to any public school or public College;

b) a participant in any benefit, service, privilege, program, facility, or activity provided or administered by a state or local government;

c) an applicant for private or state employment, private or state employee; a member or applicant for membership in any labor organization or hiring hall; or an applicant for employment through any employment agency, labor organization or hiring hall;

d) a juror or prospective juror in state court;

e) a traveler or user of any facility of interstate commerce or common carrier; or

f) a patron of any public accommodation, including hotels, motels, restaurants, lunchrooms, bars, gas stations, theaters…or any other establishment which serves the public and which is principally engaged in selling food or beverages for consumption on the premises.

3) Prohibits interference by force or threat of force against any person because he/she is or has been, or in order to intimidate such person or any other person or class of persons from participating or affording others the opportunity or protection to so participate, or lawfully aiding or encouraging other persons to participate in any of the benefits or activities listed in items (1) and (2), above without discrimination as to race, color, religion, or national origin.

Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to one year, or both, and if bodily injury results or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire shall be fined or imprisoned up to ten years or both, and if death results or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be subject to imprisonment for any term of years or for life or may be sentenced to death.


Title 18, U.S.C., Section 1001
Fraud and False Statements

 

U.S. Code as of: 01/02/01

Section 1001. Statements or entries generally

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative, or   judicial branch of the Government of the United States, knowingly and willfully -
(1) falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact;

(2) makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or

(3) makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry; shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.


18 USC Sec. 1203
TITLE 18 – CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
PART I – CRIMES
CHAPTER 55 – KIDNAPPING
Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : Title 18 : Section 1203 

STATUTE

(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, whoever, whether inside or outside the United States, seizes or detains and threatens to kill, to injure, or to continue to detain another person in order to compel a third person or a governmental organization to do or abstain from doing any act as an explicit or implicit condition for the release of the person detained, or attempts or conspires to do so, shall be punished by imprisonment for any term of years or for life and, if the death of any person results, shall be punished by death or life imprisonment.


U.S. Code as of: 01/02/01

Section 2234. Authority exceeded in executing warrant

Whoever, in executing a search warrant, willfully exceeds his authority or exercises it with unnecessary severity, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year. U.S. Code as of: 01/02/01

Section 2235. Search warrant procured maliciously Whoever maliciously and without probable cause procures a search warrant to be issued and executed, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year.

Section 2236. Searches without warrant

Whoever, being an officer, agent, or employee of the United States or any department or agency thereof, engaged in the enforcement of any law of the United States, searches any private dwelling used and occupied as such dwelling without a warrant directing such search, or maliciously and without reasonable cause searches any other building or property without a search warrant, shall be fined for a first offense not more than $1,000; and, for a subsequent offense, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.

This section shall not apply to any person -
(a) serving a warrant of arrest; or
(b) arresting or attempting to arrest a person committing or
attempting to commit an offense in his presence, or who has
committed or is suspected on reasonable grounds of having
committed a felony; or
(c) making a search at the request or invitation or with the
consent of the occupant of the premises.

More on Section 2236


Title 42 USC Section 1983

 

Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : Title 42 : Section 1983

Sec. 1983. – Civil action for deprivation of rights

Every person who, under color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage, of any State or Territory or the District of Columbia, subjects, or causes to be subjected, any citizen of the United States or other person within the jurisdiction thereof to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution and laws, shall be liable to the party injured in an action at law, suit in equity, or other proper proceeding for redress, except that in any action brought against a judicial officer for an act or omission taken in such officer’s judicial capacity, injunctive relief shall not be granted unless a declaratory decree was violated or declaratory relief was unavailable. For the purposes of this section, any Act of Congress applicable exclusively to the District of Columbia shall be considered to be a statute of the District of Columbia

Title 42 USC Section 1983 Information


Title 42, U.S.C., Section 14141
Pattern and Practice

 

Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : Title 42 : Section 14141

This civil statute was a provision within the Crime Control Act of 1994 and makes it unlawful for any governmental authority, or agent thereof, or any person acting on behalf of a governmental authority, to engage in a pattern or practice of conduct by law enforcement officers or by officials or employees of any governmental agency with responsibility for the administration of juvenile justice or the incarceration of juveniles that deprives persons of rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States.

Whenever the Attorney General has reasonable cause to believe that a violation has occurred, the Attorney General, for or in the name of the United States, may in a civil action obtain appropriate equitable and declaratory relief to eliminate the pattern or practice.

Types of misconduct covered include, among other things:

1. Excessive Force
2. Discriminatory Harassment
3. False Arrest
4. Coercive Sexual Conduct
5. Unlawful Stops, Searches, or Arrests


FRAUD

 

Section 1001. Statements or entries generally

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative, or judicial branch of the Government of the United States, knowingly and willfully -

(1) falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact;

(2) makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or

(3) makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry; shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.

(b) Subsection (a) does not apply to a party to a judicial proceeding, or that party’s counsel, for statements, representations, writings or documents submitted by such party or counsel to a judge or magistrate in that proceeding. (OK for system to lie?)

(c) With respect to any matter within the jurisdiction of the legislative branch, subsection (a) shall apply only to -

(1) administrative matters, including a claim for payment, a matter related to the procurement of property or services, personnel or employment practices, or support services, or a document required by law, rule, or regulation to be submitted to the Congress or any office or officer within the legislative branch; or

(2) any investigation or review, conducted pursuant to the authority of any committee, subcommittee, commission or office of the Congress, consistent with applicable rules of the House or Senate.

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Posted by admin - November 24, 2010 at 3:35 am

Categories: Victims of Child Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Sexual Abuse Laws – Children Sexual Exploitation Law

  • § 2251. Sexual exploitation of children
  • § 2251A. Selling or buying of children
  • § 2252. Certain activities relating to material involving the sexual exploitation of minors
  • § 2252A. Certain activities relating to material constituting or containing child pornography
  • § 2252B. Misleading domain names on the Internet
  • § 2252C. Misleading words or digital images on the Internet
  • § 2253. Criminal forfeiture
  • § 2254. Civil forfeiture
  • § 2255. Civil remedy for personal injuries
  • § 2256. Definitions for chapter
  • § 2257. Record keeping requirements
  • § 2257A. Record keeping requirements for simulated sexual conduct
  • § 2258. Failure to report child abuse
  • § 2258A. Reporting requirements of electronic communication service providers and remote computing service providers
  • § 2258B. Limited liability for electronic communication service providers, remote computing service providers, or domain name registrar?1
  • § 2258C. Use to combat child pornography of technical elements relating to images reported to the CyberTipline
  • § 2258D. Limited liability for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
  • § 2258E. Definitions
  • § 2259. Mandatory restitution
  • § 2260. Production of sexually explicit depictions of a minor for importation into the United States
  • § 2260A. Penalties for registered sex offenders

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Posted by admin - November 13, 2010 at 10:22 pm

Categories: Sexual Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , ,

US Codes – Sexual Abuse Law Links

Sexual Abuse Laws

Links to Sexual Abuse Laws:

US Codes: Sexual Exploitation and Other Abuse of Children
~ Title 18, Part I, Chapter 110 [offsite]

US Codes: Sexual Abuse
~ Title 18, Part I, Chapter 109A [offsite]

US Codes: Sexual Exploitation & Other Child Abuse
~ US Code Title 18, Part I, Chapter 110, Section 2252 [offsite]

US Codes: Transportation for Illegal Sexual Activity
~ Title 18, Part I, Chapter 117 [offsite]

State Websites [search state laws].

This information may be extracted, edited, and/or paraphrased from government publications.
The website host is not responsible for the source or accuracy of information.

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Posted by admin - November 12, 2010 at 10:37 pm

Categories: Sexual Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , ,

Jesuit Priest Sexual Abuse Victims

In the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, Jesuit priests and brothers around the Northwest physically and sexually abused children and teens at Jesuit-run schools and missions. The abuse perpetrated on victims ranged from inappropriate touching to rape.

The perpetrators of the abuse worked for the Society of Jesus, Oregon Province, a religious order based in Portland, Oregon. The Province operated schools, missions, and churches throughout Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Alaska for decades, going back to the 1940′s. Many of these schools, missions, and churches were on Indian reservations, and many of the victims were Native Americans. However, the race, age, and gender of the victims varied greatly.

The number of children and teens abused is estimated to be in the hundreds, perhaps thousands, over several decades. The abuse perpetrated by these Jesuits was pervasive and damaged many lives. The evidence revealed to date indicates that the Province failed to monitor sexual perpetrators and in some cases knowingly transferred the perpetrators to other locations, allowing them to abuse again.

Get help if you have been abused by a Jesuit priest here: http://www.priestabuselaw.com/

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Posted by admin - September 14, 2010 at 5:23 am

Categories: Child Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Abused by the System – University Arkansas Report

Child Abuse Victims Abused Again by System

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Children who survive the trauma of sexual abuse are likely to experience a second violation — this time at the hands of the very people intended to protect them, says a University of Arkansas researcher.

Parents, child protection officials, even the system that records and processes sexual abuse cases can unintentionally inflict additional trauma on young victims, states Rebecca Newgent, assistant professor in the department of education leadership, counseling and foundations.

“Not only do these kids endure the sexual assault. They then have to face a whole crowd of strangers — from policemen to medical professionals and lawyers — prodding them, asking them to relive the assault again and again. On top of that, they may return to families who don’t understand what the children went through or how to cope with it,” Newgent said.

These factors not only lead to additional trauma, but they also increase the risk that children will be victimized again, according to Newgent.

In an article titled “The Retraumatization of Child Sexual Abuse: the Second Insult,” published in the most recent issue of the journal Trauma and Loss: Research and Interventions, Newgent identifies the practices and procedures that hurt young victims even as they attempt to help. But she also suggests that parent education as well as minor modifications in the reporting and recording process could greatly reduce subsequent trauma and risk.

In 1997, Child Protective Service agencies received more than three million reports of alleged child maltreatment. Among these reports, 15 percent — representing nearly 480,000 children — indicated some form of sexual abuse. In her article, Newgent lists the potential threats that await children after reporting a sexual assault and offers advice on how to ameliorate those threats or avoid them altogether. Some of these threats include:

THE CHILD PROTECTION SYSTEM:
In the effort to record and process cases of sexual abuse, the very system designed to protect children may submit them to unnecessary, additional trauma, Newgent said.

The most obvious mistake is that the system requires children to retell, and thereby relive, the experience of sexual assault over and over again for a variety of different officials. A child may be questioned by medical doctors during the initial exam, then by social workers and finally attorneys — all trying to gather the evidence they need to perform their role in the child’s case.

Furthermore, the examination and investigation processes are often more invasive than necessary, causing the child greater fear and distress, perhaps even additional feelings of shame.

Newgent recommends that child protection agencies streamline the process and work collaboratively with other officials so that children recount their experiences only once. Facilities should be arranged so that a non-invasive medical examination can be completed and a single interrogation conducted in a child-friendly environment. Use of one-way mirrors would allow all relevant officials to witness these procedures without intimidating the victim, and videotapes of the procedures could provide a record for future reference.

Another common mistake relates to the officials themselves, rather than the system. Newgent cites past studies, which show that cultural and gender biases may skew how counselors and other professionals treat and perceive victims of sexual assault. Their attitudes may be transmitted unknowingly to the child, resulting in greater guilt and self-blame.

To counteract such biases, Newgent emphasizes the importance of proper training and competence among those who interact with sexual assault victims. She notes that an unbiased and supportive environment is particularly crucial in the initial stages of assessment and treatment.

PARENTAL REACTION:
The circumstances of a child’s abuse and the symptoms that a child displays afterward can greatly influence the way parents subsequently relate to their child. Parents may be ashamed of their child’s experience or embarrassed by the hyper-sexuality that many children exhibit after sexual trauma. Alternatively, parents may misperceive the sexual assault as normal interaction or may be overly tolerant of inappropriate sexual behavior following the assault.

Though seemingly opposite, these reactions can lead to similar outcomes: callous attitudes toward the child, greater blame of the child and decreased emotional support. Such family environments not only scar the child, but they also may feed into the cycle of violence that traps many victims. Family dysfunction can lead to deviant behavior, which increases the risk that victims of abuse will one day become abusers.

“It’s not enough to treat the child. Parents have to be educated too. It’s essential that support agencies provide family counseling even if none of the family members were the perpetrator,” Newgent said. “It’s also important that parents take the initiative to inform themselves.”

Education is not just important for the parents of victims, Newgent added. Parents should be doing more to learn about dangers and protect their children before an assault occurs.

“Schools and clinics often have wonderful educational services, but very few parents take advantage of them,” she said. “Every bit of information that you can get to help your kids — that’s certainly not asking too much.”

——————————————
“The Retraumatization of Child Sexual Abuse: The Second Insult”
Rebecca A. Newgent
University of Arkansas

Lisa K. Fender-Scarr and Jamie L. Bromley
University of Akron

ABSTRACT:

The traumatization of child sexual abuse does not end with the criminal act itself. Young victims’ participation in the multiple systems purporting to assist them can lead to retraumatization, the second insult. Counselors who work with children need to be aware of how variables such as prior child sexual abuse, the male as victim, victim characteristics, caregiver and family characteristics, and whether or not the crime was reported can affect the level of emotional health and recovery for these children. Current literature examines the effects of many of these variables on an individual basis. In order to help reduce the chances of young victims being revictimized counselors need to look at how these variables interact with each other and manifest themselves in the systems helping children. Assisting young victims of abuse includes having an understanding of the theories of child maltreatment. Implications for counselors in regard to the second insult include the development of competency in the realm of child sexual abuse and treatment, collaboration between multiple systems, and implementation of specialized programming. Case vignettes are provided to illustrate the variables of retraumatization.

—University of Arkansas

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Posted by admin - August 30, 2010 at 11:43 pm

Categories: Child Abuse Laws   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,